Antonio and the Electric Scream: The Man Who Invented the Telephone

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Branden Books, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 138 pages
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Antonio Meucci represents an unlikely story in American history. Having come of age in Florence, Italy, he immigrated to America by way of Cuba, where he lived for many years and where he worked with the Italian Opera Company. Familiar with telegraphy, wherein intelligence (information) was being transmitted through a wire, he proposed to transmit human voice through the same type of wire. Having come to New York, and having established several kinds of business, he experimented with his telettrofono (electric phone). Satisfied with the results of having transmitted voice intelligence from one end to the other end of copper wire, Meucci applied for a patent and received a caveat instead. A. Graham Bell, however, received a patent for a similar invention. Now, finally, after more than 160 years, Meucci is being vindicated: 1) A Silver and Bronze Medal were struck by The Italian American Bicentennial Society. 2. The Meucci-Garibaldi Museum has been established in New York. 3. The US Postal Services has published a commemorative stamp, and, 4. The 107th Congress of the United States resolved to recognize Meucci as the inventor of the telephone.
  

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Contents

I
7
II
9
III
15
IV
23
VI
33
VII
39
IX
47
XI
59
XIV
82
XV
87
XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
116
XIX
126
XX
129
XXI
134

XII
66
XIII
75

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About the author (2010)

Sandra Meucci, Ph.D. lives in the Pacific Northwest where she sorks as a researcher and writer. On hearing that Anonio Meucci was the inventor of the telephone, at first she rejected that claim. In view of newly discoverd information, she has now changed her mind.

Bibliographic information