The Beatles: Image and the Media

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Univ. Press of Mississippi, Sep 18, 2009 - Music - 303 pages
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"The Beatles: Image and the Media" charts the transformation of the Beatles from teen idols to leaders of the youth movement and powerful cultural agents. Drawing upon American mainstream print media, broadcasts, albums, films, and videos, the study covers the band's career in the United States. Michael R. Frontani explores how the Beatles' media image evolved and how this transformation related to cultural and historical events.

Upon their arrival in the U.S., the Beatles wore sharply tailored suits and cast themselves as adorable, accessible teen heartthrobs. By the end of the decade, they had absorbed the fashion and consciousness of the burgeoning counterculture and were using their interviews, media events, and music to comment on issues such as the Vietnam War, drug culture, and civil rights. Frontani traces the steps that led to this change and comments on how the band's mantra of essential optimism never wavered despite the evolution of its media profile.

  

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Contents

The Twentieth Centurys Greatest Romance Imagining the Beatles
1
Ladies and Gentlemen The Beatles Introducing the Image
20
Preparing Our Teenagers for Riot and Ultimate Revolution The Touring Years 196466
70
The Mood of the Sixties The Beatles as Artists 196668
126
Beatlepeople Rolling Stone 196770
178
Beautiful People The Beatles Idealized Past
215
Notes
237
Bibliography
255
Index
275
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Michael R. Frontani is associate professor of communications at Elon University. His work has appeared in American Journalism, Journal of American Culture, Journalism History, and African Studies Review.

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