Poland, 1918-1945: An Interpretive and Documentary History of the Second Republic

Front Cover
Routledge, 2004 - History - 221 pages
0 Reviews

Based on extensive range of Polish, British, German, Jewish and Ukranian primary and secondary sources, this work provides an objective appraisal of the inter-war period.

Peter Stachura demonstrates how the Republic overcame giant obstacles at home and abroad to achieve consolidation as an independent state in the early 1920s, made relative economic progress, created a coherent social order, produced an outstanding cultural scene, advanced educational opportunity, and adopted constructive and even-handed policies towards its ethnic minorities.

Without denying the defeats suffered by the Republic, Peter Stachura demonstrates that the fate of Poland after 1945, with the imposition of an unwanted, Soviet-dominated Communist system, was thoroughly undeserved.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

References to this book

About the author (2004)

Peter D. Stachura is Professor of Modern European History and Director of The Centre for Research in Polish History at the University of Stirling. His research interests are in twentieth-century German history, with particular reference to the Weimar Republic, and Polish history, in particular the Second Republic. He has published extensively in both these areas. His books include Themes of Modern Polish History, Poland Between the Wars and Poland in the Twentieth Century.

Bibliographic information