Poland's Holocaust: Ethnic Strife, Collaboration with Occupying Forces and Genocide in the Second Republic, 1918-1947

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McFarland, Nov 1, 1997 - History - 451 pages
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With the end of World War I, a new Republic of Poland emerged on the maps of Europe, made up of some of the territory from the first Polish Republic, including Wolyn and Wilno, and significant parts of Belarus, Upper Silesia, Eastern Galicia, and East Prussia. The resulting conglomeration of ethnic groups left many substantial minorities wanting independence. The approach of World War II provided the minorities' leaders a new opportunity in their nationalist movements, and many sided with one or the other of Poland's two enemies--the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany--in hopes of achieving their goals at the expense of Poland and its people. Based on primary and secondary sources in numerous languages (including Polish, German, Ukrainian, Belorussian, Russian and English), this work examines the roles of the ethnic minorities in the collapse of the Republic and in the atrocities that occurred under the occupying troops. The Polish government's response to mounting ethnic tensions in the prewar era and its conduct of the war effort are also examined.
  

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Contents

Soviet Terror
7
Nazi Terror
21
Jewish Collaboration
35
Interwar Years
36
Soviet Occupation
48
Postwar Years
58
German Occupation
66
Polish Collaboration
77
Lithuanian Collaboration
159
Soviet Occupation
160
German Occupation
163
Ukrainian Collaboration
177
Interwar Years
179
Soviet Occupation
198
German Occupation
204
Ethnic Cleansing
242

German Occupation
82
Assistance to Jews
112
Postwar Years
128
Belorussian Collaboration
143
Soviet Occupation
144
German Occupation
148
Conclusion
259
Documents
263
Notes
293
Bibliography
389
Index
407
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About the author (1997)

Tadeusz Piotrowski is a professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire in Manchester where he also teaches courses in anthropology and the Holocaust, and where he served as the Associate Dean of Faculty. He has received many awards including the Outstanding Associate Professor Award. He lives in Manchester.

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