The Chinese Parrot

Front Cover
Echo Library, May 1, 2007 - 180 pages
18 Reviews
1926. The character of Charlie Chan was based in part on the experiences of two Chinese detectives, Chang Apana and Lee Fook, who Biggers had read about in a Honolulu newspaper while on vacation. Biggers wrote six Charlie Chan mysteries. The Chinese Parrot is the second book in the series and begins: Alexander Eden stepped from the misty street into the great, marble-pillared room where the firm of Meek and Eden offered its wares. Immediately, behind showcases gorgeous with precious stones or bright with silver, platinum and gold, forty resplendent clerks stood at attention. Their morning coats were impeccable, lacking the slightest suspicion of a wrinkle, and in the left lapel of each was a pink carnation, as fresh and perfect as though it had grown there.

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Review: The Chinese Parrot (Charlie Chan #2)

User Review  - Gilbert M. - Goodreads

Every once in a while I read a mystery where I figure out the whole puzzle right up front and spend the rest of the book happily uncovering evidence that my assumptions are correct. That happened to ... Read full review

Review: The Chinese Parrot (Charlie Chan #2)

User Review  - Christine - Goodreads

Just an ok read. The title and synopsis is what drew me to this book,because I am interested in parrots and I was hoping that the parrot played more of a part in the story,but it's very little ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Earl Derr Biggers was born in 1884 in Warren, Ohio. He graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. After college, Biggers went to work at The Boston Traveler, where he wrote a humorous column, and then reviews, until 1911. By that time he had finished his first novel, "Seven Keys To Baldpate," migrated to New York with his first novel and also his first comedy, "If You're Only Human" and began writing plays. Biggers wrote magazine articles, stories, novels and plays, including a war play, "Inside The Lines," which ran 500 nights in London in 1915 and 1916. He published two more novels during the 1910s, Love Insurance in 1914 and The Agony Column in 1916, but his main activity was focused on humor writing, particularly in magazines and short stories. In 1919, Biggers decided to quit playwriting and go to California to write for motion pictures. His reputation spread among the public with his most famous creation, Charlie Chan. He developed the character of Charlie Chan for his novel "The House Without A Key" in 1925. He wrote six Charlie Chan novels, all moderately popular. All were adapted to the cinema, except for "Keeper Of The Keys". The Charlie Chan movies were one of the most successful screen series in history, with over 40 movies based on the character. There were also numerous Chan radio adaptations and comic strips, as well as attempts to bring the character to television. Earl Biggers died in Pasadena, California, in April of 1933 at the age of 48, from a heart attack.

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