Reading Medieval Latin

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 24, 1995 - Foreign Language Study - 398 pages
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Reading Medieval Latin is an introduction to medieval Latin in its cultural and historical context and is designed to serve the needs of students who have completed the learning of basic classical Latin morphology and syntax. (Users of Reading Latin will find that it follows on after the end of section 5 of that course.) It is an anthology, organised chronologically and thematically in four parts. Each part is divided into chapters with introductory material, texts, and commentaries which give help with syntax, sentence-structure, and background. There are brief sections on medieval orthography and grammar, together with a vocabulary which includes words (or meanings) not found in standard classical dictionaries. The texts chosen cover areas of interest to students of medieval history, philosophy, theology, and literature.
  

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Contents

List of maps and plans
vii
Preface
ix
List of sources
xi
List of abbreviations
xvii
Introduction
1
The foundations of Christian Latin
5
Education
7
Liturgy and Divine Office
18
From the end of the Ottoman Renaissance 1002 to the Concordat of Worms 1122
173
The Norman Conquest
175
The investiture contest
192
The First Crusade
218
Philosophy and theology
230
Poetry
243
The twelfthcentury Renaissance
253
The schools and the scholastic method
255

The Bible
29
The Church Fathers
43
The new Christian genres
57
Early Medieval Latin
67
HibernoLatin
70
AngloLatin
93
Continental Latin
116
The Carolingian Renaissance
133
The Ottoman Renaissance
151
The religious life
268
Theology and philosophy
296
Historical writing
310
Court literature
332
Grammar
362
Orthography
373
Note on vocabulary
376
Vocabulary
378
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Keith Sidwell is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies, University of Calgary. He has written on Greek drama, later Greek literature - including most recently Lucian: Chattering Courtesans and Other Sardonic Sketches (2004) - and on Neo-Latin writing and is a co-author of the Reading Greek and Reading Latin series, and author of Reading Medieval Latin (1995).

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