Behold the Hero: General Wolfe and the Arts in the Eighteenth Century

Front Cover
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Nov 10, 1997 - Art - 306 pages
0 Reviews
McNairn analyses representations of Wolfe in both popular culture and high art, from mass-produced ceramics to Benjamin West's famous painting of the death of Wolfe, from popular songs to the writings of Oliver Goldsmith, Horace Walpole, Tobias Smollett, Thomas Godfrey, Benjamin Franklin, and William Cowper. He argues that Wolfe became the embodiment of British patriotism and the superiority of the English way of life, and that the multitude of literary and visual works about Wolfe, which primarily focus on his death, were created in an environment in which legends of inspiring, politically persuasive heroics were much in demand. Behold the Hero will be of interest to historians of eighteenth-century England and America, art historians, material historians, and students of eighteenth-century English literature and drama.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Up Up with Roast Beef
3
Sorrow Turned into Joy
7
The Glorious Catastrophe
20
Too Short Was His Life But Immortal His Deeds
40
They Vote a Monument of Lasting Fame
62
A Coat and Waistcoat Subject
91
Ardent for Fame
109
A Revolution in Art
125
1o Lively and Impressive Instruction
165
The Front Face Is No Likeness at All
184
Wolfe Now Detached and Bent on Bolder Deeds
205
The Realism Was Overpowering
234
Appendix Birth and Death Dates of Individuals Discussed in the Text
245
Notes
253
Index
303
Copyright

It Was He Who Had Immortalized Wolfe
144

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information