Asteroids III

Front Cover
William Frederick Bottke
University of Arizona Press, Jan 1, 2002 - Science - 785 pages
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Two hundred years after the first asteroid was discovered, asteroids can no longer be considered mere points of light in the sky. Spacecraft missions, advanced Earth-based observation techniques, and state-of-the-art numerical models are continually revealing the detailed shapes, structures, geological properties, and orbital characteristics of these smaller denizens of our solar system. This volume brings together the latest information obtained by spacecraft combined with astronomical observations and theoretical modeling, to present our best current understanding of asteroids and the clues they reveal for the origin an,d evolution of the solar system. This collective knowledge, prepared by a team of more than one hundred international authorities on asteroids, includes new insights into asteroid-meteorite connections, possible relationships with comets, and the hazards posed by asteroids colliding with Earth. The book's contents include reports on surveys based on remote observation and summaries of physical properties; results of in situ exploration; studies of dynamical, collisional, cosmochemical, and weathering evolutionary processes; and discussions of asteroid families and the relationships between asteroids and other solar system bodies. Two previous Space Science Series volumes have established standards for research into asteroids. Asteroids III carries that tradition forward in a book that will stand as the definitive source on its subject for the next decade.
  

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Contents

Giuseppe Piazzi and the Discovery of Ceres
17
Asteroid Orbit Computation
27
T 485 585
42
NearEarth Asteroid Search Programs
45
Bus S J 169633
54
Analysis and Potential Impact Detection
55
Observational Selection Efiects in Asteroid Surveys
71
Clark B E 123 585
87
725
346
Mission Summary
351
The 2001 Perspective
367
Implications
379
The Ejfect of Yarkovsky Thermal Forces on the Dynamical Evolution of Asteroids and Meteoroids
395
Origin and Evolution of NearEarth Objects
409
Asteroidal Dust
423
Laboratory Experiments and Scaling Laws
443

The Comparison of SizeFrequency Distributions of Impact Craters and Asteroids
89
Cloutis E A 183
99
Asteroid Masses and Densities
103
Asteroid Rotations
113
DellGro A 619
121
Asteroid Photometric and Polarimetric Phase Ejjects
123
Evans J B 45
138
Asteroid Models from Diskintegrated Data
139
J 183
149
Asteroid Radar Astronomy
151
VisibleWavelength Spectroscopy of Asteroids
169
Mineralogy of Asteroids
183
Kehoe T J J 423
202
Asteroids in the Thermal Infrared
205
Observations from Orbiting Platforms
219
Larsen J 71
233
The Astronomical Record
235
Physical Properties of NearEarth Objects
255
151
268
Physical Properties of Trojan and Centaur Asteroids
273
Asteroids Do Have Satellites
289
Miiller T G 219
310
Cratering on Asteroids from Galileo and NEAR Shoemaker
315
Asteroid Geology from Galileo and NEAR Shoemaker Data
331
Asteroid Interiors
463
Asteroid Density Porosity and Structure
485
Evidence and Evolution
501
Spin Rate Changes Tumbling Rotation States and Binary Asteroids
517
The Fate of Asteroid Ejecta
527
Collisional Evolution of SmallBody Populations
545
Thermal Evolution Models of Asteroids
559
The Smallest Terrestrial Planet
573
Asteroid Space Weathering and Regolith Evolution
585
The Determination of Asteroid Proper Elements
603
Asteroid Family Identification
613
Physical and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families
619
Spectroscopic Properties of Asteroid Families
633
Asteroid Meteoroid Streams
645
Their Number and Identification
653
Evolution of Comets into Asteroids
669
Chronology of Asteroid Accretion and Dijkrentiation
687
Meteorite Evidence for the Accretion and Collisional Evolution of Asteroids
697
Primordial Excitation and Depletion of the Main Belt
711
Origin and Evolution of Trojan Asteroids
725
Dealing with the Impact Hazard
739
Asteroid Data Archiving in the Planetary Data System
757
Color Section following page
774
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

William F. Bottke is Senior Research Scientist at the Department of Space Studies at the Southwest Research Institute. Alberto Cellino is Astronomer at the Torino Astronomical Observatory. Paolo Paolicchi is Associate Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Pisa. Richard P. Binzel is Professor of Planetary Science at MIT and was the principal editor for the Space Science Series volume Asteroids II. All four have had asteroids named in their honor in recognition of their contributions to the field.

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