Borges and Translation: The Irreverence of the Periphery

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Bucknell University Press, Jan 1, 2005 - History - 267 pages
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This book studies how Borges constructs a theory of translation that plays a fundamental role in the development of Argentine literature, and which, in turn, expands the potential for writers in Latin America to create new and innovative literatures through processes of re-reading, rewriting, and mis-translation. The book analyzes Borges's texts in both an Argentine and a transnational context, thus incorporating Borges's ideas into contemporary debates about translation and its relationship to language and aesthetics, Latin American culture and identity, tradition and originality, and center-periphery dichotomies. Furthermore, a central objective of this book is to show that the study of the importance of translation in Borges and of the importance of Borges for translation studies need not be separated. Furthermore, translation studies has much to gain by the inclusion of Latin American thinkers such as Borges, while literary studies has much to gain by in-depth considerations of the role of translation in Latin American literatures. Sergio Waisman is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at The George Washington University.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgments
7
Delineating a Cultural
19
The Development of a Theory
41
Writing as Translation
84
Mistranslating From
124
A Meeting at the Limits
157
Conclusions
202
Notes
219
Bibliography
248
Index
260
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Sergio Waisman is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at The George Washington University.

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