Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volumes 22-24; Volumes 1861-1864 (Google eBook)

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Priestley and Weale, 1862 - Astronomy
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Contents

Note on U Geminorum by Mr Baxendell 9
91
Places of Comet II 1862 observed at Armagh by Mr Edmondson
97
Account of Observations at Malta by Mr Las sell
106
Fellow elected
131
Fellows elected
141
Extract of a Letter from Mr A Auwers to the Rev R Main on
148
Observations of Transit of Mercury Solar Eclipse and Occultation
154
Fellow elected
173
Fellows elected
229
On the Transit of Mercury of 11 Nov 1861 observed at HobartTown
235
On the Companions of Siriiu by M Goldschmidt
243
Fellows elected
261
Transit of Mercury of 1 ith November 1861 by Mr Todd
267
Results of Meridional Observations of Small Planets Occultation of
273
Observations of Comet II 1861 made with the Heliometer at
287
Pge
304
On the Great Comet of 1861 by the Rev T W Webb
305
1861
315
Fellow elected i
317
Progress of the Charts in course of execution at Bonn Communicated
318
New Determination of the Longitude of the Sydney Observatory
321
Total Solar Eclipse Dec ji 1861 by Mr Hind 6
6
Results of the Meridional Observations of Small Planets Occupations
12
On the Appearances presented by the Planet Mart on Oct 26 and
31
An Account of Observations on Solar Radiation by Mr Waterston 60
60
Places of Comet II 1861 by Mr Edmondson Assistant Armagh
65
On the Strife of Stellar Spectra from the Memorie Aatronomiche
100
Remarks upon the Phenomena attending the Disappearance by rotation
108
On the Discordance between the Results for the Zenith Distance
144
Elements of Feronia and Observations of a new Minor Planet
146
Observation of a Solar Facula by Capt Noble
151
On Comet II 1861 and on some other Comets by Dr Mackay 160
160
Occultation observed at Highbury by Mr Burr 166
166
Results of Meridional Observations of Small Planets Occupation of
173
Discovery of a Companion of Sirius
181
Fellows elected 183
183
CONTENTS
243
Appointment of M Otto Struve to the Directorship of the Observatory
248
Total Eclipse of the Moon June 1st 1863 by Capt Noble
252
On the Minor Planet Feronia by Dr Peters 256
256
Ephemcris of Proserpine by M Hoek 275
275
Elements and Ephemerides of two new Comets III and IV 1861
276
Fellows elected i
277
On a Mode of Figuring Glass Specula for the Newtonian Telescope
278
Observations of Comet II 1861 at Ascension Island by Mr J
18
Results of the Meridional Observations of Small Planets Occupations
24
Instruments for sale 27
27
Observations of Comet II 1862 by Mr Knott 30
30
Fellow elected 33
33
Remarks on some Astronomical Eyepieces by the Rev W R Dawes 37
37
On the Eclipses recorded in the Ancient Chinese Historical Work
39
and V 1863 by Mr Romberg
45
On the Solar Energy as manifested in the Autumn of 1861 and
46
Miscellaneous 257
47
A few Notes on Professor C P Smyths Experiences with the Elchies
72
P A Hansen Darlegung der theoretischen Berechnung der in
81
Further Note on the supposed Observation of an IntraMercurial Planet
101
Companion of Siriut Extract of Letter from the Rev W Dawes 102
102
Sur deux Inegalites dune grandeur iemarquable dans les Appari
117
Minor Planet Clytia 50
126
Discovery and Elements of a New Minor Planet
131
Minor Planet Galatea 51
132
Instrument for Sale
148
Observations sur la Comparaison établie par M
159
Printed by 8TBAiorwAY6 and Walden Castle St Leicester Sq and Published
172
Further Observations on Solar Spots by the Rev F Howlett
174
On the Acceleration of the Mean Motion of the Moon by Prof Hansen
215
Occultation of Caneri observed at Highbury by Mr Burr 221
221
Index 225
225
Death of Capt Jacob 3fi
226
Observations of Comets II and III 1863 by Mr Hodgson 227
227
Printed by Strancicways and Walden Castle St Loicester Sq and Published
229

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Page 212 - For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water, whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished; but the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men.
Page 130 - Arranged to meet the requirements of the Syllabus of the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, South Kensington.
Page 363 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It is made in compliance with copyright law and produced on acid-free archival 60# book weight paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding...
Page 139 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 258 - If the whole excess in the motion of the perihelion of Mars is attributed to a ring of asteroids situate at a distance from the Sun equal to that of the Earth, the total mass of these asteroids will be somewhat greater than that of Mars, and will be equal to the fraction 0-138 of the mass of the Earth. 2°. If the whole excess is attributed to a group of asteroids between Mars and Jupiter (distance from the Sun between 2...
Page 26 - Astronomical Observations made at the Observatory of Cambridge by the Rev. JAMES CHALLIS, MA, FRS, FRAS, Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy in the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Trinity College.
Page 40 - ... considerations which, in my own view, serve to invalidate this calorific theory. 1. The specific difference of mean temperature in the intertropical winds as compared with equal zones of extratropical winds, is inadequate and wholly disproportioned to the dynamical effects which are exhibited in these winds. I am not aware that any successful attempt has been made to prove the converse of this objection. 2. The rising of the whole body of the trade wind in the equatorial latitudes, in the manner...
Page 216 - Airy's zenith sector, was the arrangement for making successive observations in two positions of the instrument, face east and face west, at the same transit. The second principle was the substitution of a level or system of levels for the usual plumb-line. The third principle was the casting in one piece, as far as practicable, of each of the different parts of the instrument, in order to avoid the great number of screws and fastenings with which most instruments are hampered, and to secure, if...
Page 133 - Mr. De La Rue's claim to the special notice of astronomers, as a delineator of celestial objects through the medium of photography, does not rest on the absolute priority of his application of a well-known art in a new direction. It is rather based on the fact that by methods and adaptations peculiarly his own, he has been the first to obtain automatic pictures of the sun and moon, sufficiently delicate in their detail to advance our knowledge regarding the physical characters of those bodies, and...
Page 174 - That locality, therefore, is very favourable. ' Selecting, secondly, the parts of the Earth at which the duration of transit would be longest, it will be found that the choice is more limited, and the practical difficulties rather greater. For the acceleration of ingress at...

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