The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus (Google eBook)

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Ticknor and Fields, 1864 - Ethics - 310 pages
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Page 55 - But the only distinct meaning of that word is stated, fixed, or settled; since what is natural, as much requires and presupposes an intelligent agent to render it so, ie to effect it continually or at stated times, as what is supernatural or miraculous does to effect it for once. And from hence it must follow, that persons...
Page 93 - I received the idea of a polity in which there is the same law for all, a polity administered with regard to equal rights and equal freedom of speech, and the idea of a kingly government which respects most of all the freedom of the governed...
Page 50 - What then is that which is able to conduct a man ? One thing, and only one, philosophy. But this consists in keeping the daemon within a man free from violence and unharmed, superior to pains and pleasures, doing nothing without a purpose, nor yet falsely and with hypocrisy, not feeling the need of another man's doing or not doing anything...
Page 13 - I was not hurried into any offence against any of them, though I had a disposition which, if opportunity had offered, might have led me to do something of this kind; but, through their favour, there never was such a concurrence of circumstances as put me to the trial.
Page 136 - Everything harmonizes with me which is harmonious to thee, O Universe. Nothing for me is too early nor too late, which is in due time for thee. Everything is fruit to me which thy seasons bring, O Nature: from thee are all things, in thee are all things, to thee all things return.
Page 159 - Such as are thy habitual thoughts, such also will be the character of thy mind ; for the soul is dyed by the thoughts. Dye it then with a continuous series of such thoughts as these : for instance, that where a man can live, there he can also live well.
Page 88 - From my mother, piety and beneficence, and abstinence, not only from evil deeds, but even from evil thoughts; and further, simplicity in my way of living, far removed from the habits of the rich. 4. From my great-grandfather, not to have frequented public schools, and to have had good teachers at home, and to know that on such things a man should spend liberally.
Page 278 - What a soul that is which is ready, if at any moment it must be separated from the body, and ready either to be extinguished or dispersed or continue to exist ; but so that this readiness comes from a man's own judgment, not from mere obstinacy, as with the Christians, but considerately and with dignity and in a way to persuade another, without tragic show.
Page 195 - A scowling look is altogether unnatural; when it is often assumed,2 the result is that all comeliness dies away, and at last is so completely extinguished that it cannot be again lighted up at all. Try to conclude from this very fact that it is contrary to reason. For if even the perception of doing wrong shall depart, what reason is there for living any longer? 25 Nature which governs the whole will soon change all things which thou seest, and out of their substance will make other things, and again...
Page 185 - When thou wishest to delight thyself, think of the virtues of those who live with thee ; for instance, the activity of one, and the modesty of another, and the liberality of a third, and some other good quality of a fourth. For nothing delights so much as the examples of the virtues, when they are exhibited in the morals of those who live with us and present themselves in abundance, as far as is possible. Wherefore we must keep them before us.

References from web pages

Marcus Aurelius
... The Emperor Marcus Antoninus, His Conversation with Himself, 1701; The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus, 1862 (tr. by George Long) ...
www.kirjasto.sci.fi/ aurelius.htm

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