Biology: Life on Earth

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Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005 - Science - 897 pages
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The number of biology-related issues in our society is growing constantly. This book helps readers digest a wealth of scientific information with relevant references and examples.Includes new Links to Life feature—ends each chapter on a relevant note with short, informally written segments on familiar topics, such as “Health Food.” Contains Earth Watch, Health Watch, and Scientific Inquiry Essays that introduce readers to the exploration of key environmental and health-related issues. Features a striking illustration program with consistent, strategic use of color, revised multi-part figures, and updated labels and captions.A fascinating reference for anyone interested in learning more about biological issues in our world.

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Contents

Why Preserve Biodiversity?
14
CASE STUDY REVISITED Life on Earthand Elsewhere?
16
UNIT ONE THE LIFE OF A CELL
19
Copyright

117 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Terry and Gerry Audesirk grew up in New Jersey, where they met as undergraduates. After marrying in 1970, they moved to California, where Terry earned her doctorate in marine ecology at the University of Southern California and Gerry earned his doctorate in neurobiology at the California Institute of Technology. As postdoctoral students at the University of Washington's marine laboratories, they worked together on the neural bases of behavior, using a marine mollusk as a model system.

Terry and Gerry are now professors of biology at the University of Colorado at Denver, where they have taught introductory biology and neurobiology since 1982. In their research lab, funded by the National Institutes of Health, they investigate the mechanisms by which neurons are harmed by low levels of environmental pollutants.

Terry and Gerry share a deep appreciation of nature and of the outdoors. They enjoy hiking in the Rockies, running near their home in the foothills west of Denver, and attempting to garden at 7000 feet in the presence of hungry deer and elk. They are long-time members of many conservation organizations. Their daughter, Heather, has added another focus to their lives.

Bruce E. Byers, a midwesterner transplanted to the hills of western Massachusetts, is a professor in the biology department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He's been a member of the faculty at UMass (where he also completed his doctoral degree) since 1993. Bruce teaches introductory biology courses for both nonmajors and majors; he also teaches courses in ornithology and animal behavior.

A lifelong fascination with birds ultimately led Bruce to scientific exploration of avian biology. His current research focuses on the behavioral ecology of birds, especially on the function and evolution of the vocal signals that birds use to communicate. The pursuit of vocalizations often takes Bruce outdoors, where he can be found before dawn, tape recorder in hand, awaiting the first songs of a new day.

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