Speeches of Henry Lord Brougham, upon questions relating to public rights, duties, and interests: with historical introductions, and a critical dissertation upon the eloquence of the ancients, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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A. and C. Black, 1838 - Great Britain
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Page 105 - Lordships— which was unnecessary, but there are many whom it may be needful to remind— that an advocate by the sacred duty which he owes his client knows, in the discharge of that office, but one person in the world, that client and none other. To save that client by all expedient means, to protect that client at all hazards and costs to all others, and among others to himself, is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties. And he must not regard the alarm, the suffering, the torment, the...
Page 225 - ... nature has not made us suitable to each other. Tranquil and comfortable society is, however, in our power ; let our intercourse, therefore, be restricted to that, and I will distinctly subscribe to the condition which you required, through Lady Cholmondeley, that even in the event...
Page 225 - Our inclinations are not in our power, nor should either of us be held answerable to the other, because nature has not made us suitable to each other.
Page 227 - My lords, I pray you to pause. I do earnestly beseech you to take heed ! You are standing upon the brink of a precipice — then beware ! It will go forth your judgment, if sentence shall go against the Queen. But it will be the only judgment you ever pronounced, which, instead of reaching its object, will return and bound back upon those who give it.
Page 227 - Majocchi about the banker's clerk — or such as all the other contradictions and falsehoods not going to the main body of the case, but to the main body of the credit of the witnesses — let not man rashly and blindly, call these things accidents.
Page 240 - Turkey, had numerous disputes which it became necessary to settle by litigation, — 'and,' says his biographer, ' our merchant found by experience, that in a direct fact a false witness was a surer card than a true one ; for if the judge has a mind to baffle a testimony, an...
Page 348 - ... dare utter the word hypocrisy, and complain of those who charged you with it ! This is indeed to insult common sense, and outrage the feelings of the whole human race ! If you were hypocrites before, you were downright, frank, honest hypocrites to what you have now made yourselves — and surely, for all you have ever done, or ever been charged with, your worst enemies must be satiated with the humiliation of this day, its just atonement, and ample retribution ! If Mr.
Page 519 - Continent renders very unlikely, and because it was well worth while to incur a loss upon the first exportation in order by the glut to stifle in the cradle those rising manufactures in the United States which the war has forced into existence contrary to the natural course of things.
Page 486 - ... us will not live to see the end of! Immortal in the triumphs of our enemies, and the ruin of our allies, the costly purchase of so much blood and treasure! Immortal in the afflictions of England, and the humiliation of her friends, through the whole results of his twenty years...
Page 369 - The jury found for the plaintiffs with .£147 damages, and a general verdict was entered. The solicitor-general obtained a rule to show cause why the judgment should not be arrested...

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