A Little History of Canada

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Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2011 - History - 228 pages
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On a blustery night in December 1775, a snowstorm saved Canada from American invasion, the attackers unprepared for Quebec's northern climate. Throughout his concise history, award-winning author H.V. Nelles reminds us of such fateful events, whether strategic or happenstance, that have shaped Canada as we know it today.
Beginning with the earliest human occupation of North America, nearly 14,000 years ago, Nelles takes us on a whirlwind tour of the land and its inhabitants to the present day. Canada's enduring theme, he argues, is transformation. The country has undergone several fundamental changes-from Aboriginal occupation, to French and British colonization, to the rise of an independent nation and distinct society-and it is doing so yet again.
Fully revised throughout, this updated edition incorporates the latest research that helps us understand the course of history. A new concluding chapter unpacks the challenges that the country has faced in the twenty-first century: Canada-US relations post 9/11, the country's place within the global economy, a continuous influx of immigration, and the geographical consequences of global warming. Lively and opinionated, this is the ever-evolving story of a nation.

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User Review  - Lindsay - Goodreads

Its not a badly wirten little book. But for anyone that took grade 10 history in a canadian highschool, its a little repetative. For anyone looking to get a basic idea of Canadian history, its not a bad place to start. Read full review

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About the author (2011)


H.V. Nelles is the award-winning author of The Art of Nation-Building, Monopoly's Moment, and The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and has twice received the Sir John A. Macdonald Prize in Canadian History. Currently, he holds the L.R. Wilson Chair in Canadian History at McMaster University.

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