Rasputin's Bastards

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jun 15, 2012 - Fiction - 500 pages
24 Reviews

They were the beautiful dreamers. From a hidden city deep in the Ural mountains, they walked the world as the coldest of Cold Warriors, under the command of the Kremlin and under the power of their own expansive minds. They slipped into the minds of Russia's enemies with diabolical ease, and drove their human puppets to murder, and worse. They moved as Gods. And as Gods, they might have remade the world. But like the mad holy man Rasputin, who destroyed Russia through his own powerful influence . . . in the end, the psychic spies for the Motherland were only in it for themselves.

It is the 1990s. The Cold War is long finished. In a remote Labrador fishing village, an old woman known only as Babushka foresees her ending through the harbour ice, in the giant eye of a dying kraken–and vows to have none of it. Beaten insensible and cast adrift in a life raft, ex-KGB agent Alexei Kilodovich is dragged to the deck of a ship full of criminals, and with them he will embark on a journey that will change everything he knows about himself. And from a suite in an unseen hotel in the heart of Manhattan, an old warrior named Kolyokov sets out with an open heart, to gather together the youngest members of his immense, and immensely talented, family. They are more beautiful, and more terrible, than any who came before them. They are Rasputin's bastards. And they will remake the world.

  

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... still, interesting premise, and decent writing. - Goodreads
It's not that the writing isn't good - because it is. - Goodreads
The mysteries of the plot pull you along. - Goodreads

Review: Rasputin's Bastards

User Review  - trickgnosis - Goodreads

An intriguing read if this sort of thing appeals. There are a couple of missteps plot and pace-wise but I enjoyed it. Note to the author: Glocks do not have a safety. A small thing it's true but for anyone knowledgeable about firearms it immediately spoils the suspension of disbelief. Read full review

Review: Rasputin's Bastards

User Review  - Tone - Goodreads

There's a lot of cleaver ideas in here, the use of the post-Cold War for settings and characters and psychic warfare. Nickle avoids the telepathy trap of just having characters stare at each other and shake, ala Scanners, by having them navigate thought each others psyches through their memories. Read full review

Contents

Dramatis Personae
A Lost Opportunity
The Idiot
The Gambler
There Are No Guilty People The House of the Dead
The Gambler
The Insulted and the Injured The Grand Inquisitor
The Gambler
The Insulted and the Injured
The Grand Inquisitor
The Idiot and the Honest Thief
The Grand Inquisitor
The Little Hero
The Honest Thief
Acknowledgements
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

David Nickle is the author of numerous short stories and several novels, including Eutopia: A Novel of Terrible Optimism, Rasputin's Bastards, and The 'Geisters. He lives in Toronto, where he works as a journalist, covering Toronto City Hall for Metroland Media Toronto.

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