The Cook's Oracle: Containing Receipts for Plain Cookery, on the Most Economical Plan for Private Families; Containing Also a Complete System of Cookery for Catholic Families (Google eBook)

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R. Cadell, 1845 - Cooking - 424 pages
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Gingerbread, Gypsie cake, cheesecakes, and more, more, more!

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Page 19 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 265 - Wherefore did Nature pour her bounties forth With such a full and unwithdrawing hand, Covering the earth with odours, fruits, and flocks, Thronging the seas with spawn innumerable, But all to please and sate the curious taste?
Page 20 - At supper this night he talked of good eating with uncommon satisfaction. "Some people," said he, "have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully; for I look upon it that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else.
Page 303 - Put no water at all ; For it maketh things small, Which, lest it should happen, A close cover clap on. Put this pot of Wood's metal...
Page 22 - Johnson's own notions about eating however were nothing less than delicate : a leg of pork boiled till it dropped from the bone, a veal pie with plums and sugar, or the outside cut of a salt buttock of beef, were his favourite dainties : with regard to drink, his liking was for the strongest, as it was not the flavour, but the effect he sought for, and professed to desire ; and when I first knew him, he used to pour capillaire into his Port wine.
Page 162 - Soak them in cold water, wash them well, then put them into plenty of boiling water, with a handful of salt, and let them boil gently till they are tender, which will take an hour and a half, or two hours ; the surest way to know- when they are done enough, is to draw out a...
Page 22 - I never knew any man who relished good eating more than he did. When at table, he was totally absorbed in the business of the moment; his looks seemed rivetted to his plate; nor would he, unless when in very high company, say one word, or even pay the least attention to what was said by others, till he had satisfied his appetite...
Page 306 - V\i« trimmings and stuffing into a stewpan with a pint and a half of broth or water, let it boil half an hour, and then rub it through a sieve : — put half an ounce of butter into a stewpan; as it melts, mix a tablespoonful of flour with it, stir it over the fire a few minutes, then mix the gravy with it by...
Page 303 - Take a knuckle of veal ; You may buy it, or steal. In a few pieces cut it : In a stewing pan put it. Salt, pepper, and mace Must season this knuckle ; Then* what's join'd to a place, With other herbs muckle ; That, which kill'd king Willf: And what never stands still J.
Page 68 - ... it has when muffled up. This may give rather more trouble, but those who wish to excel in their art must only consider how the processes of it can be most perfectly performed...

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