The Great Radio Sitcoms

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McFarland, 2007 - Performing Arts - 288 pages
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On January 12, 1926, radio audiences heard the first exchanges of wit and wisdom between "Sam 'n' Henry"--the verbal jousters who would evolve into Amos 'n' Andy and whose broadcasts launched the radio sitcom. Here is a detailed look at 20 of the most popular such sitcoms that aired between the mid-1920s and early 1950s, the three-decade heyday of radio. Each series is discussed from an artistic and historical standpoint, with attention to the program's character development and style of comedy as well as its influence on other shows. The work provides complete biographical profiles of each sitcom's stars as well as several actors whose careers consisted primarily of supporting roles in these popular broadcasts. Appendices include an abbreviated summary of thirteen sitcoms beyond those discussed in the main body of the book, and a comprehensive list of 170 radio sitcoms.

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Adventures of Ouie and Harriet
7
The AUrich Family
19
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Jim Cox was the recipient of the 2002 Ray Stanich Award, given to one individual annually for prolific research and writing in old time radio, at the Friends of Old Time Radio Convention, vintage radio's largest annual event. In 2007, Jim Cox received the Stone-Waterman Award presented by the Cincinnati Old Time Radio and Nostalgia Convention for outstanding contributions to the preservation of old time radio history. He is also the author of Radio Speakers (2007), The Daytime Serials of Television, 1946-1960 (2006), Music Radio (2005), Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons (2004), Frank and Anne Hummert's Radio Factory (2003), Radio Crime Fighters (2002), Say Goodnight, Gracie (2002), The Great Radio Audience Participation Shows (2001) and The Great Radio Soap Operas (1999). He is a retired college professor living in Louisville, Kentucky.

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