Habitants and Merchants in Seventeenth-Century Montreal

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1992 - History - 428 pages
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Louise Dechêne uses the island of Montreal in the seventeenth century as a case study for an analysis of the establishment of colonial society, placing her findings in a broad historiographical context that also takes account of developments in Europe and America. Dechêne investigates the emergence of urban and rural communities shaped both by their French cultural background and by the new environment. Her work provides a wealth of information on immigration, trade and agriculture, social hierarchy, religion, and family life. Dechêne's work, when first published, constituted a major milestone in the development of methodology and use of sources. Her systematic examination of difficult and massive documentary collections blazed a number of new trails for other researchers. Her judicious blending of numerical data and "qualitative" findings makes this book one of the rare examples of "new history" that avoids the extremes of statistical abstraction and anecdotal antiquarianism. Habitants and Merchants in Seventeenth-Century Montreal won the Governor-General's Award and the Garneau Medal from the Canadian Historical Association when it first appeared in French.
  

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Contents

PART ONE THE POPULATION
1
The French Population
16
Demographic Profile
47
The Basic Features of the Trade
65
Trade Relations
90
The Physical Setting
129
The Pattern of Settlement
144
Occupying the Land
152
PART FOUR THE SOCIETY
197
Social Groups
211
The Family
237
Religious Life
260
Conclusion
279
Weights and Measures
289
Graphs
297
Notes
323

Running the Farm
169
The Agrarian Economy
184
Note on Manuscript Sources
427
Copyright

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