The Black-Tailed Prairie Dog: Social Life of a Burrowing Mammal

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University of Chicago Press, Apr 1, 1995 - Nature - 557 pages
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In The Black-Tailed Prairie Dog, John L. Hoogland draws on sixteen years of research at Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in the United States to provide this account of prairie dog social behavior. Through comparisons with more than 300 other animal species, he offers new insights into basic theory in behavioral ecology and sociobiology.

Hoogland documents interactions within and among families of prairie dogs to examine the advantages and disadvantages of coloniality. By addressing such topics as male and female reproductive success, inbreeding, kin recognition, and infanticide, Hoogland offers a broad view of conflict and cooperation. Among his surprising findings is that prairie dog females sometimes suckle, and at other times kill, the offspring of close kin.

Enhanced by more than 100 photographs, this book illuminates the social organization of a burrowing mammal and raises fundamental questions about current theory. As the most detailed long-term study of any social rodent, The Black-Tailed Prairie Dog will interest not only mammalogists and other vertebrate biologists, but also students of behavioral and evolutionary ecology.
  

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Contents

Taxonomy and Natural History
7
Burrows
26
Study Sites and Methods
37
Costs and Benefits of Coloniality
72
The Coterie
102
Infanticide the Major
125
The Antipredator Call
163
Communal Nursing
187
Factors That Affect Annual
287
Litter Size and Juvenile Body Mass
294
Weather and Precipitation versus ARS
305
Reproductive Synchrony versus ARS
313
Coterie Size versus ARS
320
Type of Coterie versus ARS
329
Levels of Inbreeding
337
Do Mothers Manipulate
360

Kin Recognition Social
201
Do Males Discriminate between Their
207
Why Dont Prairie Dogs Discriminate between
214
Behavioral Observations
221
Evidence for the Accuracy of Behavioral
248
The Worst Enemy
257
Annual and Lifetime Reproductive Success
260
Sex Ratio of Litters at First Emergence versus Paternal
370
Demography and Population Dynamics
376
Behavioral Ecology of Prairie Dogs
402
Appendix A Common and Scientific Names
413
Bibliography
427
Index
521
Copyright

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Page 458 - US DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE, Washington, DC, January 22, 1973.
Page 493 - A summary of the history and a survey of the present distribution of the disease.
Page 457 - Mammalogy 62:706-712. Foltz, DW, and JL Hoogland. 1983. Genetic evidence of outbreeding in the blacktailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus). Evolution 37:273-281. Foltz, DW, JL Hoogland, and GM Koscielny.
Page 483 - MICHENER, GR 1977. Effect of climatic conditions on the annual activity and hibernation cycle of Richardson's ground squirrels and Columbian ground squirrels. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 55:693-703.

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About the author (1995)

JOHN L. HOOGLAND is a researcher at Appalachian Laboratory, the University of Maryland, Frostburg, and has studied prairie dogs for 32 years.

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