The Man Who Was Thursday

Front Cover
Bibliolis Books, 2010 - Fiction - 200 pages
581 Reviews
First published in 1908, The Man Who Was Thursday is often described as a metaphysical thriller, but it goes much deeper than that, as the anarchists are not only in a rebellion with the government, but often with God as well. Set in turn of the century London, Gabriel Syme is part of a secret task force at Scotland Yard, sent undercover to investigate the anarchists. He infiltrates the anarchist's world, meeting an openly anarchist poet, Lucian Gregory, at a party. This meeting sets off a sequence of nightmarish events that will keep you glued to every gripping page of The Man Who Was Thursday.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
165
4 stars
206
3 stars
141
2 stars
56
1 star
13

I loved Chesterton's prose. - Goodreads
Strong start, weak ending. - Goodreads
Very interesting read by a fantastic writer. - Goodreads
Sketching out the plot would be a useless affair. - Goodreads
This book is a great introduction to Chesterton. - Goodreads
It is optimism couched in pessimistic premise. - Goodreads

Review: The Man Who Was Thursday

User Review  - Tomas - Goodreads

Possible the best initial two chapters of any book I've read. Wonderful combination of light hearted poetic language with intriguing plot. Unfortunately it went downhill quickly after that. Read full review

Review: The Man Who Was Thursday

User Review  - J. Boo - Goodreads

Hard to classify! Mainly an adventure novel, but with surreal satirical Christian apologetic allegory mixed in. The ending seems to confuse a lot of reviewers, who missed the build-up and perhaps don ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
23
Section 4
36
Section 5
48
Section 6
58
Section 7
68
Section 8
79
Section 9
94
Section 10
112
Section 11
130
Section 12
140
Section 13
159
Section 14
173
Section 15
187
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was an English writer, often referred to as the prince of paradox. Chesterton is well known for his fictional priest-detective Father Brown, and for his reasoned apologetics. Even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the wide appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man.

Bibliographic information