Three great novels of the Civil War

Front Cover
Wings Books, Oct 26, 1994 - Fiction - 884 pages
1 Review
A moving collection of novels that explore the powers, passions, and politics of the war between the North and South includes Killer Angels, by Michael Shaara, Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, and Andersonville.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Contents

Map List
9
To the Reader
11
Foreword
13
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1994)

MARC JAFFE, an editor and publisher--for eighteen years Editorial Director at Bantam Books--has had decades-long experience with writing of the West, beginning with his first job in publishing as Western Editor at New American Library.

Michael Shaara was a novelist, short story writer, and educator. He was born in Jersey City, New Jersey on June 23, 1928. Shaara earned a B.S. from Rutgers University and did graduate work at Columbia University and the University of Vermont. Shaara spent two years in the service, worked as a policeman and a sailor, and became associate professor at Florida State University in 1961. From 1961 to 1965 he wrote, produced, and performed in a show for educational television. Shaara published a novel in 1974 titled, The Killer Angels. The novel told the story of the Battle of Gettysburg from the point of view of the men fighting it. It received the Pulitzer Prize in 1975. In 1993, the novel was the basis for the motion picture Gettysburg. Shaara also published more than 70 short stories that appeared in several U.S. and foreign publications and wrote several more novels. Shaara died on May 5, 1988.

Stephen Crane authored novels, short stories, and poetry, but is best known for his realistic war fiction. Crane was a correspondent in the Greek-Turkish War and the Spanish American War, penning numerous articles, war reports and sketches. His most famous work, The Red Badge of Courage (1896), portrays the initial cowardice and later courage of a Union soldier in the Civil War. In addition to six novels, Crane wrote over a hundred short stories including "The Blue Hotel," "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," and "The Open Boat." His first book of poetry was The Black Riders (1895), ironic verse in free form. Crane wrote 136 poems. Crane was born November 1, 1871, in Newark, New Jersey. After briefly attending Lafayette College and Syracuse University, he became a freelance journalist in New York City. He published his first novel, Maggie: Girl of the Streets, at his own expense because publishers found it controversial: told with irony and sympathy, it is a story of the slum girl driven to prostitution and then suicide. Crane died June 5, 1900, at age 28 from tuberculosis.