Nazism and the Working Class in Austria: Industrial Unrest and Political Dissent in the 'National Community'

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 8, 2002 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
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The image of Hitler as a demagogic 'pied piper' leading astray the 'little people' of Austria is as misleading as it is powerful. Nazism and the Working Class in Austria is a case study of the ambiguous relationship between state and society in Austria under the Nazis. It places the experience of Austrian industrial workers in the Third Reich in a broader historical context, from the origins of the earliest 'national socialist' movements in the backwaters of the Habsburg empire to the end of the Second World War. Workers did not seriously attempt or even expect to overthrow the Nazi regime in the face of unprecedented surveillance and terror; but neither were they converted, and their oppositional strategies and disgruntled political opinions reveal a truculent workforce, rather than one that was contented and converted.
  

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Contents

Austrian fascisms Austrofascism and the working class
19
Economic integration and political opposition between
48
The war economy and the changing workforce
68
Work discipline in the war economy
86
Popular opinion and political protest in workingclass
109
Conclusion
135
Notes
142
Select bibliography
171
Index
185
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