The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 4

Front Cover
John Whitney Hall
Cambridge University Press, Jun 28, 1991 - History - 860 pages
3 Reviews
This is the fourth of six volumes designed to explore the history of Japan from prehistoric to modern times. Volume 4 roughly covers the years from 1550 to 1800, a short but surprisingly eventful period in Japanese history commonly referred to as Japan's Early Modern Age. At the start, much of the country was being pulled apart by local military lords engaged in a struggle for land and local hegemony. These daimyo succeeded in dividing Japan into nearly autonomous regional domains. Before the end of the seventeenth century, however, the daimyo in turn were subjected to a powerful unification movement led by three colorful figures, Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, and Ieyasu. It was under Tokugawa Ieyasu, the last of the unifiers, that Japan was brought together under a single powerful command vested in the office of shogun. The Tokugawa hegemony lasted until 1868 when it was brought down by the Meiji Restoration. This volume attempts to flesh out the historical tale with insights into the way that people lived and worked. It examines the relationship between peasant and local lord, and between the lord, as a unit of local government, and the emerging shogunate. It offers new insights into the evolution of indigenous thought and religion and it also deals with Japan's foreign relations, particularly the impact of the Christian missionary movement. Each of these themes is examined by thirteen distinguished Japanese and American scholars.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 1: Ancient Japan

User Review  - Dumitru Condrea - Goodreads

A brilliant tome on the ancient history of Japan, especially for those who only have a vague idea about it. The chapter about the earliest societies of Japan is, of course, a heavy read compared to ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The role of local studies
9
Formation of the early modern village
16
Patterns of political development
22
a new field of study
30
A final word
38
The military and economic base
53
The social and economic consequences of unification
96
Thought
395
Politics in the eighteenth century
425
The Shotoku era
437
The village and agriculture during the Edo period
478
The social composition of the early modern village
486
Landtax revenue and government finances
492
Irrigation and land reclamation
498
Technology and commercial agriculture
504

Commerce and the early modern cities
110
The early modern social system
121
The bakuhan system
128
Formation of the Edo bakufu
145
the authority structure
156
The han
183
The han and central control 16001651
191
The han and central control after 1651
201
Han finances
213
Panorama Edo and
217
Han politics
225
Japans relations with China
235
War and peace
265
Christianity and the daimyo
301
Deus or Dainichi?
307
Otomo Sorin Yoshishige
316
The Jesuit colony of Nagasaki
326
The vicissitudes of Bungo
335
The end of Ryuzoji Takanobu
343
The collapse of the Otomo realm
353
Hideyoshis antiChristian edicts
359
The Christian daimyo and the early Tokugawa
365
Thought and religion 15501700
373
Cooperative aspects of village society
515
Cities and commerce in the seventeenth century
538
Cities and commerce in the early eighteenth century
568
Cities and commerce in the late eighteenth century
579
Conclusions
590
History and nature in eighteenthcentury Tokugawa
596
Nature
621
History and nature in the late eighteenth century
638
Epilogue
656
material culture standard of living
660
The house and lifestyles
674
Food nutrition and other dietary factors
680
Clothing
689
Popular culture
706
Education
715
Books and publishing
725
Kyoto the source
733
The society of prostitutes
742
The theater world
749
The chonin
761
Works cited
771
Glossaryindex
813
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information