The Realities of International Criminal Justice

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Dawn L. Rothe, James D. Meernik, Thordis Ingadóttir
Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Jul 11, 2013 - Law - 364 pages
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The Realities of the International Criminal Justice System takes an analytical and critical look at the impact of the major instruments of international criminal justice since the 1990s with the advent of the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda and Yugoslavia.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
SixtyFive Years of International Criminal Justice The Facts and Figures ...
7
Punishing Perpetrators or Seeking Truth for Victims Serbian Opinions on Dealing with War Crimes ...
43
Justice is Interventionist The Political Sources of the Judicial Reach of the Special Court for Sierra Leone ...
63
The Financing of the Special Tribunals for Sierra Leone Cambodia and Lebanon
93
State Cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
125
A Tale of Two Institutions The United Nations Security Council and the International Criminal Court ...
147
Justice Power and Peace Conflicting Interests and the Apprehension of ICC Suspects ...
169
Which Approach to Justice in Colombia under the Era of the ICC
211
Multilayered Justice in Northern Uganda ICC Intervention and Local Procedures of Accountability ...
249
Financing the International Criminal Court
269
Enunciating Genocide Crime Rights and the Impact of Judicial Intervention
297
Public Support for the International Criminal Court
319
Afterward
339
Index
341
Copyright

The International Criminal Court A Pipe Dream to End Impunity?
191

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About the author (2013)

Dawn L. Rothe is an assistant professor of criminology at Old Dominion University. She is the author of "State Criminality: The Crime of All Crimes", "Symbolic Gestures and the Generation of Global Social Control", and coauthor with Christopher W. Mullins of "Blood, Power, and Bedlam: Violations of International Criminal Law in Post-Colonial Africa".

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