Ghosts of Halabja: Saddam Hussein and the Kurdish Genocide: Saddam Hussein and the Kurdish Genocide

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ABC-CLIO, Oct 30, 2008 - Political Science - 196 pages
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Saddam Hussein's execution for his crimes against IraQ&Apos;s Shia not only brought an end to his reign of oppression, but also to the justice that was to be served to the Iraqi Kurds. The unspeakable atrocities visited by Saddam upon the Kurds of Iraq are explored here, together with the trials of Saddam by the Iraqi High Tribunal. However, this work is more than a litigation history. It is also an exploration of the motivations behind and the depths of organized evil in the context of a single, brutal despot at the helm of an artificially created multi-ethno/religious state lying atop massive oil wealth. SaddaM&Apos;s background and the context of his rule explain much about his actions, but not all. He remained an unpredictable tyrant to the end of his reign.

The Kurds have continually been subject to adversity since the end of World War I, when they were denied their own homeland, splitting them among three countries: Turkey, Iran, and Iraq. During SaddaM&Apos;s 24-year reign, the Kurds of Iraq were frequently under the knife of injustice. Between 1987 and 1989, Saddam unleashed genocide, razing over 2,000 villages and murdering at least 50,000 Kurds. As his dictatorship came to an end, the Kurds long-awaited opportunity to hold Saddam responsible for the atrocities against them seemed to have come, only to be sidetracked by the Iraqi High Tribunal, the Iraqi government, and the U.S. government. While the Shia rejoiced in their victory, the Kurds continued to be left behind. SaddaM&Apos;s death freed him of the charges against him by the Kurds. The world had turned its back on the Kurds in their age of genocide, and now appeared to turn a blind eye to the justice that was denied.

The unspeakable atrocities visited by Saddam upon the Kurds of Iraq are explored here together with the trials of Saddam by the Iraqi High Tribunal—both the completed prosecution for the Dujail massacre against the Shites and the incomplete one for the Anfal Campaigns against the Kurds. However, this work is more than a litigation history. It is also an exploration of the motivations behind and the depths of organized evil in the context of a single, brutal despot at the helm of an artificially created multi-ethno/religious state lying atop massive oil wealth, but situated in the most dangerous part of the world. SaddaM&Apos;s background and the context of his rule explain much about his actions, but not all. He remained an unpredictable tyrant to the end of his reign.

  

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The history of the Kurds under Saddam's regime, the terrible crime of chemical gassing of Kurdish villages.Saddam Hussein was to be tried for this, but was executed before the trial was completed. Read this book together with : "A poisonous affair", by J.R.Hilterman Read full review

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Contents

Saddam Hussein and the Prelude to Genocide
1
Genocide of the Kurds
9
The Two Gulf Wars
41
Saddam on Trial
59
Conclusion
121
Declassified US Government DocumentsFinancial Backing for Iraq during IranIraq War
123
Declassified US Government DocumentsKnowledge and Reaction to Chemical Weapons Use during IranIraq War
127
Charging of Saddam Hussein Anfal
145
Statute of the Iraqi High Tribunal
147
Notes
169
Bibliography
175
Index
179
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Michael J. Kelly is Associate Dean and a Professor of Law in the School of Law at Creighton University. He is president of the US national chapter of L'Association Internationale du Droit Penal, co-chair of the American Bar Association's Task Force on Internet Governance, and a member of the President's Advisory Committee on Global Engagement for the American Association of Law Schools. He is the author or co-author of four books and more than thirty articles and book chapters and continues to serve as a contributing editor to the online legal newspaper Jurist.

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