Got a revolution!: the turbulent flight of Jefferson Airplane

Front Cover
Atria Books, 2003 - Music - 407 pages
7 Reviews
Jann Wenner, editor-in-chief and publisher of Rolling Stone, wrote, "the classic [Jefferson] Airplane lineup were both architects and messengers of a psychedelic age, a liberation of mind and body that profoundly changed American art, politics, and spirituality. It was a renaissance that could only have been born in San Francisco, and the Airplane, more than any other band in town, spread the good news nationwide." Jefferson Airplane, the most successful and influential rock band to emerge from San Francisco during the 1960s, created the sound of a generation. Their smash hits "Somebody to Love" and "White Rabbit" provided the soundtrack to the Summer of Love, virtually inventing the era's signature pulsating psychedelic music, and came to personify the decade's radical counterculture. Their appearances at the landmark Monterey Pop, Woodstock, and Altamont rock festivals -- the only band to play at all three -- placed them on the front lines during one of the most exciting, tumultuous times in American history. Their confrontational lyrics and alternative lifestyles often cast them as "outlaws in the eyes of America." Jefferson Airplane didn't just dominate American popular culture at the peak of the '60s; they transformed it. Got a Revolution! is the first full-length biography ever written about Jefferson Airplane. Jeff Tamarkin, veteran music writer and historian, has worked closely with the former members of Jefferson Airplane for more than a decade and penned more than twenty-five Airplane-related album liner notes. Those who lived it tell the story: the band members, their families, friends, lovers, crew members, and fellow musicians. The book's all-star cast includes Fellow rock legends David Crosby, Janis Joplin, Donovan, the Grateful Dead, the Rolling Stones, and Paul McCartney, to such larger-than-life cultural figures as Robert F. Kennedy, Bill Graham, Abbie Hoffman, the Hell's Angels, and even Richard Nixon. It's a tale of complex people with complex relationships living under the spotlight during a complex time. To the public, they were prototypical free-loving, good-time hippies, but to their inner circle, Jefferson Airplane was a paradoxical bunch -- constantly at odds with one another. Jefferson Airplane's members were each brilliant, individualistic artists who became the living embodiment of the ups and downs of the sex, drugs, and rock and roll lifestyle.

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Review: Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane

User Review  - Nina - Goodreads

Clear and concise writing document the journey of one of my favorite 60s groups. While there is mention of substance use, the music always dominates. Tamarkin has done an excellent job of gathering facts and interviewing key people. Read full review

Review: Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane

User Review  - Rog Harrison - Goodreads

I saw Jefferson Starship in Glasgow last month so it prompted me to read this book again. It is definitely worth a read for people who have heard the music of Jefferson Airplane and Jefferson Starship. It was written in 2003 so could probably do with an update to cover events since then. Read full review

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Contents

Halfway Down the Stairs is a Stair
1
If Only You Believe Like I Believe
5
Alternate Quantum Universes
13
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jeff Tamarkin has been a professional music journalist for more than twenty-five years. Currently the editor of Global Rhythm magazine, he was previously the editor of Goldmine, and has written for dozens of other publications. He has also authored more than twenty-five liner notes for Jefferson Airplane-related CDs. He has been and advisor to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He lives in Hoboken, New Jersey, with his wife, the novelist Caroline Leavitt, and their son, Max.

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