For Canada's Sake: Public Religion, Centennial Celebrations, and the Re-making of Canada in the 1960s

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Dec 19, 2005 - History - 308 pages
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Breaking away from the traditional analysis of church policy, sermons, and clerical scholarship, For Canada's Sake presents an exemplary analysis of the meaning behind religiously informed public celebrations and rituals such as centennial hymns and prayers and Expo pavillions. Miedema argues that the 1967 celebrations reveal the continued importance of religion to Canadian public life, showing that a waning "Christian Canada" was being replaced by an officially "interfaith" country. The author throws into bold relief the varied attempts of government officials and religious leaders to come to terms with new Canadian and global realities, as well as the response of Canadians to their own increasing religious diversity.
  

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Contents

Public Religion Public Celebrations and the Construction
3
The Things That We Believe in in This Country Stand
14
An Inclusive State a Servant Church and the Waning
41
The 1967 Centennial Celebrations the Canadian
65
The National Interfaith Conference Has Been Lost
89
Should the Government of Canada Decide That
137
The Christian Pavilion the Sermons from Science
161
Conclusion
200
Bibliography
263
Index
303
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About the author (2005)

Gary Miedema is research associate at the Centre for Research and Religion in Canada, Emmanuel College, University of Toronto.

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