The Killing Trap: Genocide in the Twentieth Century

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 20, 2005 - Political Science
0 Reviews
The Killing Trap, first published in 2005, offers a comparative analysis of the genocides, politicides and ethnic cleansings of the twentieth century, which are estimated to have cost upwards of forty million lives. The book seeks to understand both the occurrence and magnitude of genocide, based on the conviction that such comparative analysis may contribute towards prevention of genocide in the future. Manus Midlarsky compares socio-economic circumstances and international contexts and includes in his analysis the Jews of Europe, Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, Tutsi in Rwanda, black Africans in Darfur, Cambodians, Bosnians, and the victims of conflict in Ireland. The occurrence of genocide is explained by means of a framework that gives equal emphasis to the non-occurrence of genocide, a critical element not found in other comparisons, and victims are given a prominence equal to that of perpetrators in understanding the magnitude of genocide.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preliminary considerations
3
Case selection
22
Continuity and validation
43
Prologue to theory
64
A theoretical framework
83
Threat of numbers realpolitik and ethnic cleansing
113
Realpolitik and loss
135
The need for unity and altruistic punishment
169
the role of realpolitik
250
Inequality and absence of identification
264
On the possibility of revolt and altruistic
287
the Cambodian
309
realpolitik and the absence
325
affinity and vulnerability
335
Findings consequences and prevention
369
References
396

Perpetrating states
194
Raison detat raison deglise
211
Cynical realpolitik and the unwanted
237

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Manus I. Midlarsky is the Moses and Annuta Back Professor of International Peace and Conflict Resolution at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. He has authored or edited eleven books and 65 articles and book chapters. Most recently he has published The Evolution of Inequality: War, State Survival, and Democracy in Comparative Perspectives and the edited volumes Inequality, Democracy, and Economic Development (Cambridge), and the Handbook of War Studies II.

Bibliographic information