Nights in the Gardens of Spain

Front Cover
Reed Publishing, 1995 - Bisexual men - 304 pages
5 Reviews
David Munro has everything a man could wish for - a beautiful wife, two adoring daughters, a top academic position and a circle of devoted friends. But he also has another life - lived mainly at night and frequently in what he comes to know as 'The Gardens of Spain', the places where gay and bisexual men meet. Now he must choose which of his two lives to follow . . .
This landmark book is a radical departure from Witi Ihimaera's Maori novels and stories. Now in its third edition, Nights in the Gardens of Spain takes it readers along the precarious divide between sexuality and social mores, exploring the dilemmas of contemporary gay culture with anger and laughter, sensitivity and honesty.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
1
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Nights In The Gardens Of Spain

User Review  - Elizabeth Heritage - Goodreads

I found this book to be a compelling, vivid portrait of what it was like to be a gay man in Auckland in the 1990s. Ihimaera's writing is honest, raw and graceful; and the plot of this fictionalised autobiography is both emotionally and narratively satisfying. Highly recommended. Read full review

Review: Nights In The Gardens Of Spain

User Review  - Tmj13 - Goodreads

a courageous novel. Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

Witi Ihimaera was born in Gisborne, New Zealand on February 7, 1944 into a Maori family of Mormons. After completing a B.A. in English, he worked as a journalist in New Zealand and started writing fiction. His first collection of short stories, Pounamu Pounamu, was published in 1972 and his first novel, Tangi, was published in 1973. His other works include Whanau, The Matriarch, The Whale Rider, The Dream Swimmer, Sky Dancer, The Trowenna Sea, and The Parihaka Woman. In 1982 he coedited an anthology of Maori writing, Into the World of Light, and continues to be a champion of literature in English by Maoris.

Bibliographic information