Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin's Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina

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Hoover Press, Apr 19, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 216 pages
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In Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin’s Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina, Paul Gregory sheds light on how the world’s first socialist state went terribly wrong and why  it was likely to veer off course through the story of  two of Stalin’s most prominent victims. A founding father of the Soviet Union at the age of twenty-nine, Nikolai Bukharin was the editor of Pravda and an intimate of Lenin’s exile. (Lenin later dubbed him “the favorite of the party.”) But after Bukharin crossed swords with Stalin over their differing visions of the world’s first socialist state, he paid the ultimate price with his life. His wife, Anna Larina, the stepdaughter of a high Bolshevik official, spent much of her life in prison camps and in exile after her husband’s execution.

 

Drawn from Hoover Institution archival documents, the story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina begins with the optimism of the socialist revolution and then turns into a dark saga of foreboding and terror as the game changes from political struggle to physical survival. Told for the most part in the words of the participants, it is, as Robert Conquest says in his foreword, “a story told to show the horrors of fate, of personal mistreatment and suffering by real people.” It is also a story of courage and cowardice, strength and weakness, misplaced idealism, missed opportunities, bungling, and, above all, love.

  

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Review: Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin's Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina

User Review  - Amber - Goodreads

This book is exceptionally dry--historical (rather than analysis of current issues, which is the type I tend to read) non-fiction, and not at all literary. I learned a lot about Stalin and his rise to ... Read full review

Contents

A Plea from Prison
1
A Husband Executed
6
Digging His Own Grave
9
Stalin Plays an Unlikely Cupid
14
Summer with Stalin 1927
16
You and I Are the Himalayas
19
Bukharin Fights Back
22
Pity Not Me
28
Dress Rehearsal for Arrest
92
Confrontations
99
I Will Begin a Hunger Strike
103
To a Future Generation
109
On the Whipping Post
110
For or Against the Death Penalty?
116
Arrest Warrant for Bukharin N I
119
Arrest and Parting
121

A Fifteen YearOld Coconspirator
30
To a New Catastrophe with Closed Eyes
33
Stalin Is Dangerous
37
Father and Daughter as Bolshevik Idealists
40
You Can Test the Nerves of an Elephant Bukhashka
44
A Second Fateful Meeting
47
Waterloo
49
The Woman on the Train
58
Removal from the Politburo
61
Chastened Schoolboys Drop In on the Boss
65
Bukharin Sinks to His Knees
66
With Anna in the Crimea
67
Overtaken by Insanities
70
Courtship Bad Omens and Marriage
72
Kirov Is Shot
75
Nadezhda Tries to Help
77
Humiliating Editor Bukharin
80
Bukharin Opts to Stay and Fight
83
What Accusers? Theyre Dead
86
Bukharin Grovels
90
Anna Larina Is Betrayed
123
Impossible Dream
125
Bukharins Cagey Confession
126
Anna Meets a New Widow
130
Twentyone on Trial
133
Papering over Bukharins Final Defiance
138
The Ultimate Payback A Ghastly Death
142
Annas Own Ordeal
144
Back from the Precipice
146
Advice from a Mass Murderer
148
Reunion with Iura
150
Rehabilitated by Old Men
153
A Special Specially Tardy Delivery
158
Bukharin Stalin and the Bolshevik Revolution
160
notes
167
cast of characters
179
about the author
185
index
187
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Paul R. Gregory, a Hoover Institution research fellow, holds the Cullen Endowed Professorship in the Department of Economics at the University of Houston, Texas, and is a research professor at the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin. He is also the chair of the International Advisory Board of the Kiev School of Economics. Gregory is the author of  Terror by Quota (2009), Lenin’s Brain and Other Tales from the Secret Soviet Archives (2008), and The Political Economy of Stalinism (2004), all based on his work in the Hoover Institution Archives. He has also coedited archival publications, such as the prize-winning seven-volume History of Stalin’s Gulag (2004) and the three-volume Stenograms of Meetings of the Politburo of the Central Committee (2007). His publications have been awarded the Hewett Book Prize and the J.M. Montias Prize. Gregory is the coeditor of the Yale-Hoover series on Stalin, Stalinism, and Cold War. He divides his time between Houston, Palo Alto, and Berlin.

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