MIGHTY JUDGEMENT

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Penguin Group (Canada), Apr 1, 2011 - Political Science - 368 pages
3 Reviews

In Mighty Judgment Philip Slayton describes the important issues the Supreme Court decides for individual Canadians and for Canada as a nation, and the surprising and dramatic ways in which these decisions shape our future. In the Morgentaler case (1988), the court struck down laws restricting abortion, leaving Canada the only Western country without any abortion laws. In the Same-Sex Marriage Reference (2004), it decided that gays and lesbians could marry. In the Secession Reference (1998), it laid down the conditions under which Quebec could secede from Canada. In the Patrick case (2009), the court decided that the right of privacy does not stop the police from rifling through our garbage. More recently, the court administered a tongue-lashing to the federal government over its treatment of Canadian youth Omar Khadr, accused by the United States government of fighting with the Taliban.

Mighty Judgment makes clear that the Supreme Court of Canada is a political institution, and that judges are politicians. But unlike other politicians, judges cannot be voted out of office. Slayton discusses reforms that will be needed, particularly in the way judges are chosen, once we recognize that the court decides policy and plays a pivotal role in governing Canada.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LynnB - LibraryThing

Philip Slayton has written an examiniation of how the Supreme Court of Canada runs our lives. His focus is on the post-Charter era (i.e., since 1982). He looks at how the court, in making law for the ... Read full review

Review: Mighty Judgment: How the Supreme Court of Canada Runs Your Life

User Review  - Beverley - Goodreads

This is a lucid and entertaining inside look at that most mysterious institution, The Supreme Court of Canada. A must for every lawyer, aspiring lawyer and citizen. Read full review

About the author (2011)

Philip Slayton is the bestselling author of Lawyers Gone Bad. A Rhodes Scholar, he has been a law clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada, dean of a Canadian law school, and senior partner of a major Canadian law firm. He divides his time between Toronto and Port Medway, Nova Scotia.

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